6 Steps to take when using LinkedIn to Network for a Job

DECEMBER 2017 BLOG

6 Steps to take when using LinkedIn to Network for a Job

You’ve heard it before: LinkedIn is the world’s largest professional, online networking application with approximately 470 million worldwide members*. It’s also said that LinkedIn is growing at a rapid rate of two people per second. And according to Jobvite.com, at least 87 percent of recruiters are sourcing for talent on LinkedIn.

Here’s another fact that I can personally attest to: most recruiters with whom I’ve spoken tell me that LinkedIn is their site of choice when it comes to looking for talent. Not Facebook.com, Monster.com, Indeed.com, or SimplyHired.com.

Shouldn’t these facts be enough to use LinkedIn for your job search? Now, here’s the question: how can you most effectively use LinkedIn to network for a job?

1. LinkedIn is more than your online résumé

First of all, your LinkedIn profile is not simply your resume. This said, I suggest to my LinkedIn workshop that their first move is to copy and paste their résumé to their new LinkedIn profile.

From there, however, you need to add to it to make it more of a networking document that expresses your value, while also showing your personality. For example, your Summary must tell a story describing your passion for what you do, how you do what you do, and throw in some accomplishments to immediately sell yourself.

Your Experience section must include accomplishment statements with quantified results that include numbers, dollars, and percentages. I prefer each job to comprise only of accomplishments, while other LinkedIn members throw everything into the mix,

Also important is that your LinkedIn profile is optimized for keyword searches by recruiters and hiring managers. They’re looking for a specific title, vital areas of expertise, and location. For example: “sales operations” AND CRM “lead generation” AND pharmaceutical AND “greater Boston area”.

Read how to create a powerful profile with the new LinkedIn.

2. Use LinkedIn to network with people at your desired companies

Perhaps one of LinkedIn’s greatest strengths is the ability to locate the key players at the companies for which you’d like to work. My suggestion is that first you create a list of your target companies and from there connect with people on your level in those companies.

There are ways to go about getting noticed by the people with whom you’d like to connect:
1 You may want to first follow said people
2 When you visit their profile, show your profile (don’t choose anonymous)
3 Like or comment on their posts
4 Wait to see if they reach out to you first
5 Finally, ask to connect with them using a personalized message, not the default LinkedIn one

Read this popular post on the proper way to connect.

Once you’ve built your foundation, you can ask for introductions to the individuals who would be making the hiring decisions. You don’t want to do this immediately because hiring managers will be less likely to connect with you without an introduction.

Find Out The Four Steps: CLICK HERE
BE THE BEST ‘YOU’ THAT YOU ARE IN YOUR JOB SEARCH.
PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE!

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How Older Job-Seekers Can Overcome Their 3 Biggest Roadblocks

NOVEMBER 1 2017 BLOG

How Older Job-Seekers Can Overcome Their 3 Biggest Roadblocks
SOURCE: Mary Eileen Williams

As a post-50 job-seeker, you know all too well that ageism presents some major barriers to your success. Younger hiring managers are far too prone to believing unfortunate stereotypes about your skill sets, fit within the organization and attitude. Yet, by recognizing the negative preconceptions you are likely to face and preparing ways to address these obstacles, you can shift their focus to highlight
your strengths. Here are three of the biggest roadblocks and best ways to handle them.

Roadblock #1: Technology
Negative preconception: Your technical skills are deficient and outdated.

What you can do: This is the #1 stereotype held against applicants of a certain age. Unless you take the steps to address and resolve this belief, you will be eliminated on the spot.

• First, you have to be very clear that your skills are up-to-date and valued in today’s marketplace. There is no way around this. You must have the technical skills for the job. For a listing of websites that offer free and low-fee training, check out my recent Huff/Post 50 article entitled, “Why Right Now May Be The Best Time Of The Year To Find A Job.”

• Secondly, be certain you let your interviewer know that you possess the skills required for the position. If you do not openly share this information, they are likely to leap to the assumption that your skill set is outdated. That said, unless your interviewer is woefully inept, this make-or-break stereotype will remain unspoken — rendering it silent but deadly.

• You want, therefore, to practice ways you can proactively bring up any hidden objections during the interview. This is your best way to dispel these types of misconceptions. Saying something like, “I pride myself on keeping my skills cutting-edge and current” or “I’ve become the go-to person for coworkers who need help with the technical aspects of the job” are phrases that will allow you to pave the way to list your technical proficiencies. Follow these statements by citing solid examples of times when your technical expertise solved a problem, expedited a procedure or otherwise made a difference.

• Thirdly, highlight and make special note of your cross-functional skill sets. State something along the lines of, “My combination of skills in both x & y has allowed me to….” You want to show that, not only are you proficient in the skills required for the position, but—moreover—how you can contribute in ways that others cannot. This is one important instance when age and experience will give you a substantial edge over the competition.

Roadblock #2: You Won’t Fit In With The Group
Negative preconception: Hiring you will prove a cultural and personality mismatch. As an older applicant, you are likely to be stuck in your ways and unable to deal with change in a fast-paced environment. Furthermore, you may refuse to take direction from someone younger.

What you can do: Make it very clear that you have reported to younger bosses many times in the past. It has never been a problem nor have you experienced difficulties dealing with a rapidly changing workplace.

• Proactively state that you enjoy working with and learning from people of all ages. You are invigorated by diverse, fast-paced environments and thrive on variety, challenge and change. Prepare examples of times when you came up with innovative solutions and/or resolved unexpected problems. Share instances when your boss was especially complimentary and you were singled out for your contributions.

• Stress your flexibility and adaptability by providing illustrations that demonstrate you are a quick study and enjoy learning new things. Periodically refer to the fact that you like what you do, know you’re good at it, and want to continue to grow your skill set.

• Show energy and enthusiasm for the position, the company and what you know you can contribute. Be sure to make your nonverbal messages and vocal tone upbeat and enthusiastic. A positive attitude will go a long way to dispel the idea that you are just going through the motions, reluctant to take direction and can’t relate to younger co-workers.

Find Out What the Third Roadblock is: CLICK HERE

SPOTLIGHT
Laura Koury
U.S. Congress Staff Assistant
Biloxi, MS
FACET’s Resume & Career Centers services were vital to my career. They produced high-quality work and I could not be happier with the results.

The writer I worked with is very detail oriented and strives to give you the best results while keeping your best interests in mind. I would definitely recommend their services to those on the job hunt.

JOB SEARCH A Simple Networking Strategy That Makes You Memorable (for the Right Reasons)

You know that networking can connect you with the next big opportunity in your career. And that’s exactly why you leave your comfort zone to do it.

But all your efforts are a little pointless if you never follow up in a meaningful way. If you want to grow that initial meeting into something more, you have to impress the other person, and lay the foundation for an ongoing relationship.

Fortunately, it’s not as daunting as it sounds.

There’s a simple strategy you can use to stand out and impress anyone you meet (even if they’ve met 100 other people that day). I call it the Super-Connector strategy.

It’s not a substitute for the basics like confident body language and a concise elevator pitch when you introduce yourself. Rather, it builds on them to help you stand out.

Here’s how it works: Every time you meet someone new, think of one person in your network who they’d benefit from knowing, and then do your best to make the introduction within a week.

In order to do this well, you should be asking questions to learn about your new contact’s background and recent work. For example, Muse writer Andrew Horn suggests the following alternatives to “What do you do?”:

What are you most excited about at the moment?

Any big challenges coming down the line for you?

What’s the next big thing you have coming up?

If you didn’t do what you’re doing now—what kind of job would you have?

What This Sounds Like

“You know, I actually have a colleague who made the transition from nonprofit to tech. I’ll ask about connecting the two of you this week so you can share ideas.”

Why This Works

Clearly, you’re offering to connect them so they can gain valuable insights and new connection. But, it isn’t just generous, there are a lot of ways this will benefit you too:

It encourages you to listen more than you talk because you’re so focused on what they’re doing. And that helps you look genuinely interested.
It makes you stand out because you’re offering something rather than asking for help or advice. You’re giving, not taking.
It’s a seamless transition into getting their contact info.
It gives you an angle to follow-up later that week. Meeting somebody one time doesn’t make them an asset in your network. It takes multiple conversations—and this starts that discussion.
It shows how thoughtful you are. By saying you’ll check with the other person first, they know you’re thinking about how you can add value, but not simply assuming; and that you’ll treat them with the same respect. (P.S. Asking that other contact is called a “double opt-in intro” and we have a template for it here.)

As with anything else, the more you practice it, the easier it’ll become—and the more people you’ll add to your network. So, stand out by taking yourself out of the equation. Trust me: By thinking about the most valuable contact for the other person, you’ll make yourself even more memorable.

HOW TO USE LinkedIn TO FIND YOUR DREAM JOB Source: Steven Petrow

So, you want a new job? If you’re like more than 450 million others on the planet, you’re going to turn to LinkedIn to let your fingers do the heavy lifting of finding a new position. I should know—I’ve been there, done that.

But here’s something I learned only recently: More and more businesses are using LinkedIn as either their primary, or in many cases exclusive, job-posting site — which means you’ve got to learn how to play the LinkedIn game.

Job Description

Teddy Burriss, social media strategist anLinkedIn coach and trainer, says the first thing to do is make sure the job you’re seeking is in your wheelhouse, meaning, “that it’s highly relevant to who you are and what you do.” If you’re an administrative assistant, for example, it’s downright foolish to apply for a risk management position. “You’re just shooting at opportunities,” Burriss says with a quick laugh, “wasting a hiring manager’s time and tarnishing your own reputation.”

Number two: Your profile must demonstrate that you are “relevant” to the position — it needs to show the recruiter or hiring manager that you have the requisite skills, talent, and experience for this particular job. How do you do that? That takes us to Burriss’s next recommendation: Your profile must use the key words relevant to the position you want. Before you apply for positions bake those words into your profile. (To add skills to your profile, check out this guide on LinkedIn.)

Key Words

Well, that sounds easy-peasy, right? Not so fast. “Key words are not common sense,” Burriss admits, because hiring managers are often idiosyncratic in the language they use to describe a position. What you must do, he counsels, is study each job description and use the words it uses in your profile and résumé.

Trudy Steinfeld, associate vice president and executive director of NYU’s Wasserman Center for Career Development, also stresses the importance of using the right key words, because that’s how “applicant tracking systems and LinkedIn work. You have to use those exact same words to beat it.”

Burriss’s third suggestion is the most intriguing — and I actually think it’s the most likely to help you succeed: Even if a position is relevant to your skill set and sounds perfect for you, don’t just apply for it willy nilly. Burriss insists that you first need to build a relationship with individuals in the companies where you want to work.  Sure, it seems a bit old-school, but even in our high-tech world you must network.

Groups and Influencers

While you are on LinkedIn, but before you begin your job search, start a business conversation—not a job conversation—that shows off your smarts. NYU’s Steinfeld recommends joining relevant groups and following people on LinkedIn who are connected to your career interests. This will allow you to comment on relevant topics in public forums, which may get you the attention from so-called “influencers” that you’re seeking.

To join a professional group Burriss told me that a high number of jobs are what he calls “hidden” ones—they’re not publicly posted. If you’ve developed multiple relationships over time with the right people, they will come to you with these job openings. How great—and what a trick – is that! Need help finding a professional group? (Click here for an alphabetical listing or here to search by interest, organization, or affiliation.)

Advice

6 BEHAVIOURAL INTERVIEW TIPS

 

      An in-person interview can be a critical step in the hiring process and can help a recruiter or hiring manager determine whether a Job Candidate fits the organizational safety culture and core safety values of your company. Studies have shown that behavioral interviewing can be an effective interviewing technique and can help the interviewer understand more about how a candidate might act when faced with a workplace concern or safety issue.

      The premise behind behavioral interviewing is that a person’s past behavior can more accurately predict future performance in similar situations. By asking a job candidate how they performed in specific real-life settings, you’ll gain a better idea of how that person may behave if they work at your company. By considering a candidate’s propensity to adopt safe workplace practices, business owners can gain insight into how they will embrace the company’s safety culture.



To see more articles just like this one: CLICK HERE

If You’re Not Looking for a Job During the Holidays….You’re not going to Find One

There is a myth out there that says that companies don’t hire during the holidays. But it’s just that…a myth. Just ask the jobseeker who was offered a job on Black Friday. Or the one who was invited in for a second interview two days before Christmas.

Putting your job search on hold between Thanksgiving and New Year’s isn’t just a bad idea — it’s a self-fulfilling prophecy. Like hockey great Wayne Gretzky said, “You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take.” If you’re not looking for a job during the holidays, you’re not going to find one.

Employers hire all 12 months of the year. In fact, many new positions are funded to start with a new budget year — which often coincides with a new calendar year. Other hiring managers have hiring budgets that must be spent before the end of the year — “use it or lose it.” Both of these scenarios offer opportunities for jobseekers in December.

The holidays also offer some natural opportunities to network and spread the word about your job search: there are company parties, social gatherings, end-of-the-year professional association events, and even Christmas cards and letters. Many of these strategies are available whether you’re unemployed or if you have a job but are looking to improve your job situation.

Working on your job search during the holidays may also mean less competition from other candidates who put their job search on hold. Many people wait until January — making it a New Year’s Resolution — to look for a new job. If you wait until January 2 to start — or resume — your job search, you’ll have more competition.

It may even be easier to connect with a hiring manager during December as many key personnel are in the office while lower level staff takes paid holiday time off during the month.

Even if you aren’t offered a job in December, you can lay a lot of the groundwork by making connections before the end of the year, making it more likely that you’ll be hired quickly in the new year.

11 Ideas for Job Searching During the Holidays

Here are some specific strategies you can use in your holiday job search:

Accept all invitations you receive for holiday parties and get-togethers.

Whether it’s a social or charity event, dinner party, spouse’s Christmas party, or professional association event, use these opportunities to reacquaint yourself with people who might be useful in your job search, and make new connections. Be sure to follow-up.

Re-connect with old friends and colleagues.

Your network can be a great source of information, job leads, and referrals. Get back in touch with previous co-workers and supervisors, people from high school and college, former neighbors, etc.

Host your own holiday party.

It doesn’t have to be anything formal or elaborate. Hosting your own holiday open house, dinner party, or get-together can help jumpstart your job search (but that shouldn’t be the focus of your party, of course!). However, extending an invitation is a great excuse to reach out and talk with someone you haven’t spoken to in a while!

Ask for specific information or help.

For example, ask if the person knows anyone who works at “x” company instead of asking if they know of anyone hiring. During the holidays, your contacts might have more time to be of assistance, and they might be in a mood to be generous at this time of the year!

Volunteer.

There are many opportunities during the holidays to give your time to charities and organizations. Some of these opportunities might also help you build your network, make new connections, and bolster your résumé.

Use holiday cards to connect.

If Christmas cards, holiday letters, and e-greetings are part of your end-of-the-year tradition, mentioning your job search (if you’re currently unemployed, or your position is ending) can be a useful strategy. Let people know you’re looking!

Create a business networking card. Develop a business card that lists your contact information and social media links — especially to your LinkedIn profile. You can use this in lieu of your normal business card — or instead of it, if you’re unemployed.

Update your social media presence. If you don’t yet have a LinkedIn profile, now is the time to create yours. If you have one, give it a fresh look. Is it time to update it? Can you increase your number of Connections — or solicit additional Recommendations?

Read the rest of this article including Challenges To Overcome With a Holiday Job Search

It’s that Time of Year Again: the Holiday Job Search is On!

By Randall S. Hansen, Ph.D. for LiveCareer

As cooler weather arrives and stores fill aisles with holiday items, it’s easy to get distracted — even discouraged — about the holidays and your job-search. Many job-seekers believe if they are in the middle of a job-search and Thanksgiving is on the horizon, that they might as well give up finding a job until the new year.

Thinking that job-hunting, networking, and hiring stop because of the holidays is perhaps one of the biggest misconceptions of job-seekers — and that could be good news for you since you’re reading this article. The simple truth is that while the holidays do cause business to slow, employers are still interviewing and still hiring — and deep into planning for the following year. Plus, because many job-seekers suspend their job-hunting activities during the holidays, there is simply less competition for open positions.

Use the how-to advice in this article to revisit, revamp, and reinvigorate your job-search during the holidays — and by doing so lay the groundwork for giving yourself the best present of all… a new job.

How to Job-Hunting During the Holidays

The first step involves a change in your mindset — both about job-hunting and about the holidays. You’ll need to believe — really believe — that you can have job-search success during the holidays. You’ll also need to fight — and completely shake off — the holiday blues. A positive attitude and energy will not only provide you with more confidence, but will also radiate to employers — and give you an edge. Furthermore, make an action plan for the twenty or so business days between Thanksgiving and New Year’s — with a goal of accomplishing at least one job-search activity each day.

The second step is about reviewing your job-search materials and strategies. If you have been job-hunting and not receiving any (or few) interviews, it is time to revisit your resume. (Consider free and paid services for critiquing your resume, as well as our job-seeker resume tools and resources). If you are obtaining interviews, but not receiving any offers, it is time to review your interviewing strategies. (Consider asking for feedback, conducting a mock interview, and using our job interviewing resources).

The third step focuses on taking advantage of the holidays for pushing your networking activities into a higher gear. Besides your usual networking activities (which should be the main focus of your job-hunting strategy), consider sending holiday greeting cards to former co-workers, bosses, clients, vendors, and the like that include a networking or resume-highlights card; attend business, professional, and social holiday gatherings prepared with your short elevator speech and a plan to uncover any job leads and add more people to your network (but remember not to dwell on any job woes); conduct informational interviews with people — even the busiest folks (hiring managers and recruiters) are less likely to be traveling or stuck in meetings (plus most people will also be happier with the holiday spirit). Remember to follow up with all these folks after the holidays too.

The fourth step involves monitoring key employer career centers and niche and professional job boards. Even in December, new job opportunities will be posted by employers, so spend some of your time monitoring and applying for these positions. These activities should in no way consume more than a quarter of your holiday job-search activities, as the other tools of job-hunting are much more likely to lead to job leads, job interviews, and job offers. Answering an urgent call from an employer, though, could lead to a quicker than usual hiring decision.

An optional step, if you have the time and energy, is to volunteer. Charities and other organizations are often stressed to the limits trying to help people cope with the holidays. Besides the emotional and spiritual lift you’ll receive from giving back, volunteering is an excellent way to meet new people to add to your network.

Final Thoughts on Conducting a Job-Search During the Holidays

If you put your mind to it, you may be able to accomplish more for your job-search during the weeks between Thanksgiving and New Year’s than any other time. Bosses and higher-ups are less likely to be traveling and more accessible and year-end budgets and new-year budgets are being finalized opening up opportunities. Furthermore …[Read the Rest of this Article]