Flood victims eligible for disaster unemployment benefits

Louisiana flood victims eligible for disaster unemployment benefits

Nola.com:

Flood victims in 20 Louisiana parishes who lost their jobs or are temporarily out of work will be eligible for federal money to help cover lost wages. Businesses damaged by the historic flooding can also apply for relief for affected employees.

The Louisiana Workforce Commission said Tuesday (Aug. 16) it is now accepting applications for disaster unemployment assistance for workers who live in one of the parishes declared by the U.S. government as major disaster areas. Eligible individuals and businesses have until Sept. 15 to apply.

Here's how to help Louisiana flood victims

Here’s how to help Louisiana flood victims

Parishes now declared federal disaster areas include East Baton Rouge, Livingston, St. Helena, Tangipahoa, Acadia, Ascension, East Feliciana, West Feliciana, Iberia, Lafayette, Pointe Coupee, St. Landry, Avoyelles, Iberville, Jefferson Davis, Evangeline, St. Martin, St. Tammany, Washington and Vermilion.

Eligible workers can receive up to $247 a week — the maximum amount of unemployment compensation allowed in Louisiana — for each week of out of work. Benefits last up to 26 weeks as long as an individual’s unemployment continues to be the result of a disaster.

Workers, including self-employed individuals, qualify for disaster unemployment assistance payments if they:

  • were scheduled to begin work or self-employment when the flooding occurred.
  • can no longer work or perform services because of physical damage or destruction to a workplace directly caused by the flooding.
  • can establish the work or self-employment they are no longer able to perform was their principal source of income.
  • do not qualify for unemployment benefits from any state.
  • cannot perform work or self-employment because of any injury that was a direct result of the flood.
  • have become the breadwinner or major support of a household because of the death of the head of household.

Applicants must provide their Social Security number, check stubs and other documents that show they were working or self-employed when the disaster occurred. All required documents must be filed within 21 days from the date an application is submitted.

Up to three-quarters of Livingston Parish homes don't have flood insurance, records suggestOfficials estimate flooding destroyed 75 percent of homes in Livingston.

Workers are encouraged to fill out an application for assistance online at www.laworks.net. Locate the “Reemployment Services” tab on the homepage and click on the link labeled “Start or re-open an unemployment claim.”

Those who run into problems or are unable to apply online can call the Louisiana Workforce Commission Benefits Analysis Team at 1-866-783-5567. Calls are answered Tuesday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.


UNEMPLOYMENT SCAM ALERT! 

Email Scam Alert – Unemployment Benefits

Louisiana applicants for unemployment benefits should only use the official website, www.louisianaworks.net or www.laworks.net, developed and controlled by the State of Louisiana, for conducting unemployment insurance claim or employer business.

Recently, a Louisiana applicant for unemployment benefits received an email from a website claiming to be the Unemployment Advisory Department. This site and its affiliates use addresses including “support@us-benefits.org,” “unemploymentdirect.com” or “unemployment-assist.com.”

This is an identity theft scam, and it has been reported in other states as well. Emails related to this scam may request documents and information from an applicant and claim that an application is at risk of being denied, or the email may indicate that an initial application was received but not completed and provide links to continue the unemployment filing process.

Louisiana applicants are strongly urged not to register at these sites and to ignore any emails they may receive with any extensions of the addresses above. These are not websites endorsed by the Louisiana Workforce Commission or the Federal government.

The Louisiana Workforce Commission does not request personal identifying information via email, and there are no fees associated with filing for unemployment benefits.

If you believe your identity has been compromised, please contact local law enforcement and take steps to protect your identity.

 

Mind Your Manners – an Infographic

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Mind Your Manners: What to Do When You Interview

Via AkkenCloud

CareerBuilder Reveals Hot Industries for Job Growth Over the Next Five Years

CHICAGO – June 4, 2015 – Looking to find a new job, make a career change or declare a major? CareerBuilder released a new list of industries that are expected to add jobs at an accelerated pace from 2014 to 2019. The study is based on data from Economic Modeling Specialists Intl (EMSI), CareerBuilder’s labor market analysis arm that pulls data from over 90 national and state employment resources.

The U.S. is projected to create roughly 8 million jobs from 2014 to 2019 – a 5 percent increase – though a significant number of industries will likely experience a greater percentage gain during this period.

“Around one third of all U.S. industries are expected to outperform the national average for employment growth over the next five years,” said Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder and co-author of The Talent Equation. “While it’s not surprising that technology and health care made the list, the accumulation of new jobs will take place within a diverse mix of industries requiring a broad range of skills and experience.”

The following industries are among those that are projected to add at least 10,000 jobs and experience at least 15 percent growth in employment over the next five years:

Industry

2014 Jobs

2019 Jobs

Job Added 2014 – 2019

2014 – 2019  % Change

Translation and Interpretation Services

34,431

46,832

12,401

36%

Specialty Hospitals (except Psychiatric and Substance Abuse)

205,998

266,694

60,696

29%

Residential Remodelers

560,396

708,646

148,250

26%

Home Health Care Services

1,344,672

1,677,455

332,783

25%

Wine and Distilled Alcoholic Beverage Merchant Wholesalers

78,668

97,990

19,322

25%

Electronic Shopping

191,400

234,919

43,519

23%

Environment, Conservation and Wildlife Organizations

60,233

73,465

13,232

22%

Continuing Care Retirement Communities

437,292

531,030

93,738

21%

Marketing Consulting Services

258,114

313,256

55,142

21%

Offices of Physical, Occupational and Speech Therapists, and Audiologists

353,514

428,893

75,379

21%

Computer Systems Design Services

893,689

1,083,160

189,471

21%

Portfolio Management

213,997

252,526

38,529

18%

Solid Waste Collection

143,197

167,397

24,200

17%

Internet Publishing and Broadcasting and Web Search Portals

164,637

192,240

27,603

17%

Exam Preparation and Tutoring

116,009

135,389

19,380

17%

Nail Salons

136,724

158,897

22,173

16%

Beer and Ale Merchant Wholesalers

106,721

123,970

17,249

16%

Medical Laboratories

188,151

218,197

30,046

16%

Pet Care Services (except Veterinary)

93,663

108,299

14,636

16%

Sports and Recreation Instruction

153,428

177,160

23,732

15%

About CareerBuilder®

CareerBuilder is the global leader in human capital solutions, helping companies target and attract great talent. Its online career site, CareerBuilder.com®, is the largest in the United States with more than 24 million unique visitors and 1 million jobs. CareerBuilder works with the world’s top employers, providing everything from labor market intelligence to talent management software and other recruitment solutions. Owned by Gannett Co., Inc. (NYSE:GCI), Tribune Company and The McClatchy Company (NYSE:MNI), CareerBuilder and its subsidiaries operate in the United States, Europe, South America, Canada and Asia. For more information, visit www.careerbuilder.com.

CareerBuilder Media Contact
For all media inquiries and interview requests, contact:

Jennifer Grasz
(P) 773-527-1164
(E) jennifer.grasz@careerbuilder.com

FACET Lafayette Helps Louisiana Employees In Transition

For Immediate Release
Media Contact:
Julie Calzone
(337) 235-2924 ext. 18
jcalzone@calzone.com
Facet:
Carolyn Greco
337.233.8973
c.greco@facetgroup.com
FACET Lafayette Helps Louisiana Employees In Transition

(Lafayette, La.) – Due to the downturn in the economy, many local and state companies have the challenge of cutting operating budgets.   In an effort to do so, many companies opted to avoid layoffs by utilizing the services of FACET, a career management consulting firm located in Lafayette, Louisiana with offices across the country and in global markets around the world.

FACET provides a unique and legendary brand of classic, proactive and personal support to both individuals and groups through outplacement, career transition and coaching services. From the executive suite to the non-exempt frontline, FACET has helped employees change careers, find the ‘right’ job and improve performance.

One such effort was with a Louisiana university. In November of last year, Carolyn Greco, President and CEO of FACET, was contacted to provide a campus-wide career center to assist the institution’s cost-cutting initiative by reducing university operating expenses through a voluntary separation offering to university staff.

Working in collaboration with university officials, FACET set up an on-site Career Center and created customized programs for those staff members considering early retirement, moving to another full- or part-time position outside of the university, or considering starting start a business. These programs allowed university employees to remain in control of their careers as well as coaching for those who wanted to remain in their current positions. The goal of FACET and the university was to help employees understand and weigh their career options and prepare to move into implementing their decision.

Many companies, however, handle voluntary separations internally and contact FACET to provide the actual outplacement benefit which is part of the exiting employee’s severance package. FACET has provided outplacement services for state and local companies such as The Bristow Group, CenturyLink, PHI, Schumacher Clinical Partners and Stone Energy. National corporations and organizations include Adidas, Caesars Entertainment, CVS Health, Novartis, Talbot’s and United Blood Services.

“The FACET Team and I are very proud to be providing this valuable service for over 30 years. We are honored to have the challenging responsibility of coaching and motivating clients to take the tools that we provide and move forward in their careers,” said Greco.

Ms. Greco has over 30 years of comprehensive experience in workplace consulting, career development, and leadership training in a variety of applied settings. She earned a Bachelor of Arts in Education with honors from Slippery Rock University in Pennsylvania in 1970 and a Master of Arts from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette in 1976. In 1990, she received the Governor’s Small Business Award from the State of Louisiana for her company. Ms. Greco has also served on the Board of Governors for the Alumni Association at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette as well as on the Board of the Greater Lafayette Chamber of Commerce. She is a Founding Partner of the Global Outplacement Alliance.

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Ten Mistakes that are Killing your Job Search

By Liz Ryan

Years ago it was much easier to get a job than it is now. It was a straightforward process. You had one resume that you would send out in response to every job ad. You could only have one resume at a time back then because you had to type a whole new resume on a typewriter if you wanted to make one word change.

When you could finally afford it you went to a print shop and got 100 copies of your resume delivered to you in a box.

It was a grown-up moment to get those typeset resumes and say “Yes! I am a Business Professional now, people!”

You could choose cream, white, ivory, grey, pale yellow, buff or pale pink resume paper when I got my Box-O-Resumes in 1982. I forget which color I chose but I still have some of them in my garage.

Nowadays that colored resume paper is out the window. Don’t use it in your job search! Give it your kids or grand kids to scribble on.

When you wanted to apply for a job back then, you sent your resume in the mail. You sent a cover letter with each resume, in the same envelope. This was the principal way to get a job. You could also walk into the office or warehouse or factory with your resume in an envelope, chat with the receptionist and leave your resume. That worked. You could get a job that way.

Your friend who worked in the company could bring your resume into HR and literally drop it on someone’s desk. You can still get a job that way now, but it will work much better if your friend knows the hiring manager would be your boss if you get hired.

If your friend doesn’t know that person and can’t start a conversation with him or her about you and your awesomeness, then you’re better off sending that manager a Pain Letter with your Human-Voiced Resume, just like in the old days.

No one gets business mail addressed to them personally at their desk anymore, apart from spam mail. It’s very nice to open an envelope and see that someone is writing to you about you and your issues — everybody’s favorite topic!

It was easier to get a job years ago than it is now, but all that tells us is that now we need to develop new tactics to get a good job! There are not-so-great jobs everywhere. Only the pressure on those employers created by the departure of their best employees will get them to change.

If your job is a so-so job, you can launch a stealth job search at night and on the weekends and see what better opportunities are around.

The flip side of the disappearance of the old corporate ladder is that we are all running our own careers now. No one is in charge of your career except for you. You can’t and won’t have another boss who knows more about your career and your goals than you do.

The CEO of your career is you.
Anyone else who plays the part of Your Boss at any job you ever have is a partner to you as you move along your path. It’s still your path.

Here are ten job-search mistakes to avoid but don’t worry — there’s a remedy for each mistake on our list, below!

  1. Don’t restrict your job search responding to only job ads
  2. Don’t use an outdated resume
  3. Don’t forget your LinkedIn profile!
  4. Don’t brand yourself as ‘all things to all people’
  5. Don’t send the same resume to every hiring manager
  6. Don’t rely on online job application portals
  7. Don’t go to a job interview unprepared
  8. Don’t act too desperate or too submissive in a job interview
  9. Don’t bash your last employer (or any past employer) in a job interview
  10. Don’t stop job-hunting too early

Job ads are only one part of your job search activity, whether you’re a full-time or part-time job-seeker.

I want you to reach your specific hiring manager with your Pain Letter rather than responding to a job ad through a Black Hole automated recruiting portal.

When you do respond to a job ad, those responses should only take up about one-third of your available job search time and energy.

The other two-thirds of your resources will go to outreach to hiring managers on your Target Employer List, and networking.

You can update your resume every time you use it, and lots of job-seekers have three, five or even ten versions of their Human-Voiced Resume saved on their hard drive for different job-search situations. You might have one version of your resume for IT Network Technician jobs, one version of it for IT Security jobs and one more edition of your resume for IT Telephony Engineering jobs.

You know that you can do all three of those jobs with no problem, so you’ve created three versions of your resume to highlight whichever facet of your background a particular job opportunity requires.

Read Page Two of this Article

6 Job Search Tips That Are So Basic People Forget Them

by Jenny Foss for The Muse

The irony of job search advice: There’s so much available that you don’t have to spend more than four seconds Googling about before you land on some nugget of wisdom or another.

Yet, at the same time, there’s so much available (some of which completely contradicts other advice you’ll find) that it can easily overwhelm you. Which, in fact, is probably the exact opposite outcome you’re looking for when you go sleuthing for genuinely useful counsel in the first place.

So let’s do this: Let’s boil things down to a short list of sound, timeless job searching tips that’ll help you fine-tune your strategy so that you may sail through the process (or at least cut out some of the unnecessary time and frustration).

1. Make Yourself a “Smack-in-the-Forehead” Obvious Fit

When you apply for a job via an online application process, it’s very likely that your resume will first be screened by an applicant tracking system and then (assuming you make this first cut) move onto human eyeballs. The first human eyeballs that review your resume are often those of a lower level HR person or recruiter, who may or may not understand all of the nuances of that job for which you’re applying.

Thus, it behooves you to make it very simple for both the computer and the human to quickly connect their “Here’s what we’re looking for” to your “Here’s what you can walk through our doors and deliver.”

Tip

Study the job description and any available information you have on the position. Are you mirroring the words and phrases in the job description? Are you showcasing your strengths in the areas that seem to be of paramount importance to this role? Line it up. Line it up.

2. Don’t Limit Yourself to Online Applications

You want that job search to last and last? Well, then continue to rely solely on submitting online applications. You want to accelerate this bad boy? Don’t stop once you apply online for that position. Start finding and then endearing yourself to people working at that company of interest. Schedule informational interviews with would-be peers. Approach an internal recruiter and ask a few questions. Get on the radar of the very people who might influence you getting an interview. (More on that here.)

Tip

By lining up with people on the inside of the companies at which you want to work, you will instantly set yourself apart. Decision makers interview people who come recommended or by way of a personal referral before they start sorting through the blob of resumes that arrives by way of the ATS.

3. Remember That Your Resume (and LinkedIn Profile) Is Not a Tattoo

Yes, your new resume is lovely. Your LinkedIn profile, breathtaking. However, if they don’t position you as a direct match for a particular role that you’re gunning for, don’t be afraid to modify wording, switch around key terms, and swap bullet points in and out. Your resume is not a tattoo, nor is your LinkedIn profile. Treat them as living, breathing documents throughout your job search (and career).

Tip

If you’re a covert job seeker, remember to turn off your activity broadcasts (within privacy and settings) when you make edits to your LinkedIn profile. If your current boss or colleagues are connected to you on LinkedIn, they may get suspicious about all the frequent changes.

4. Accept That You Will Never Bore Anyone Into Hiring You

Don’t get me wrong—you absolutely must come across as polished, articulate and professional throughout your job search. However, many people translate this into: Must. Be. Boring.

Wrong, wrong, wrong. Realize that few people get hired because they had perfect white space on their cover letters, memorized all of the “correct” interview questions or used incredibly safe, common phraseology (i.e., clichés) throughout their resumes. All of this correctness is going to make you look staged and non-genuine.

Instead, give yourself permission to be both polished and endearing. Memorable, likable candidates are almost always the ones who go the distance.

5. If You’re Not on LinkedIn, You Very Nearly Don’t Exist

Considering that more than 90% of recruiters use LinkedIn as their primary search tool, this is not an understatement. If you’re a professional, you need to not only be on LinkedIn, you need to be using it to your full advantage. Don’t believe me? Think about it this way: If tomorrow morning, a recruiter logs onto LinkedIn looking for someone in your geography, with expertise in what you do, and you’re not there? Guess who they’re going to find and contact? Yes, that person’s name is “not you….” >>Read the rest of this article at The Muse

SPRING CLEAN YOUR JOB SEARCH!

The kick-off of a new season is the universal excuse to “start fresh.” In that spirit, we’re suggesting a little spring cleaning for your job search that doesn’t involve a trash bag or a mop.

If you find yourself months deep into a job search and still sitting at home, unemployed, perhaps your strategy needs a little TLC. Your resumé is an obvious start and here are three other valuable ways you can help make more job opportunities bloom this spring.
Revise your short-term goals

Job searches are unpredictable.

Within a month you can either have four new job leads, or none at all. To ensure you stay on top of your to-dos, always keep a list of short-term goals and frequently revisit them. Now is a great time to look back and take stock of your progress.

The goal here is to challenge yourself even more as a job seeker each time you review your list. So, if your applications haven’t been getting any attention from employers, note it in your revised list of short-term goals to, one, address the issue and, two, find a solution. For instance, you can aim to attend more networking events or teach yourself a new technical skill.
Brush up on interviewing

Interview styles are unique to each industry and company.

It’s also the make or break point of your candidacy — since a lot of effort went into your application, ensuring your readiness for it is always in your best interest. Whether you’ve struggled getting past the first round of interviews over the last few months, or haven’t interviewed in years, be proactive about it and find ways to improve.

There are many steps you can take to be better prepared. First, ensure you’re following the basic rules: dress appropriately, rehearse out loud, come ready with questions.

Next, check out the obvious reference: the company website. The career pages are often filled with tips and insights to the business’ interview style. If that doesn’t work, get some pointers from connections in your industry, or visit employer review websites like Glassdoor.com — where past and present employees often outline the recruitment process.

Learn to be a hybrid employee

In other words, be relevant. More employers are looking for multi-faceted candidates who possess soft skills, in addition to the required technical skills of the job.

So as you transition into the spring as a job seeker, consider easing up on heavily promoting your fluency across different software programs and, instead, focus on showing employers why you’re a personality they won’t be able to work without. (by Megan Santos of Jobpostings.ca)


MAPPING YOUR SPRING JOB SEARCH INFOGRAPH

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