Employees Looking for New Opportunities in 2018

Source: Hunt Scalon

facet-alert-april-graphic

Approximately three in 10 (29 percent) professionals intend to look for a new position in the next 12 months, according to a survey by Accountemps, a recruiting arm of Robert Half. Of the 27 markets surveyed, Los Angeles (40 percent), Austin (38 percent), and Dallas (37 percent) topped the list of U.S. cities with the most workers planning to find new opportunities.

“The employment market is favorable for job seekers right now, but candidates still need to put their best foot forward,” said Michael Steinitz, executive director for Accountemps. “While some aspects of the job search have changed over time, others are timeless, like having a concise and compelling resume, following up with employers after applying for a job, and sending a thank-you note after an interview.”

Here are some additional findings from recent Accountemps job search surveys:

  • Resume length is less important. Almost half (46 percent) of senior managers prefer a one-page resume for staff-level candidates, and nearly an equal number (47 percent) believe two pages is an ideal length. Ten years ago, managers were more likely to want just one page. For executive roles, half of managers (50 percent) cited two pages as acceptable, while 21 percent were most receptive to one page.
  • Employers consider more than a resume when evaluating potential hires. More than half (56 percent) of managers said the candidate’s online profile is equally important.
  • Follow-up is expected and appreciated.All HR managers surveyed encourage candidates to check in after submitting a job application. Eight in 10 (80 percent) respondents said they take thank-you messages into account when deciding who to hire, but HR managers reported receiving notes from only 24 percent of applicants. The survey also found email is the most common way to stay in touch and send thank-you notes. While following up is key, 33 percent of HR managers said they have removed a candidate from consideration because they were too pushy after an interview.

Accountemps offers the following job search tips:

  • Take stock of your successes. List your accomplishments to help you update your resume and prepare for interviews. Be ready to explain your most important career achievements with specific examples.
  • Check your online presence.Review your social media accounts to ensure they cast you in a favorable light. Also, keep your online profile up to date, noting key accomplishments at your current and previous jobs.
  • Tailor the resume to the position and employer. Describe your skills and experience in relation to the job opportunity. Detail significant contributions you’ve made at your current or former employer and how they impacted the department or company’s bottom line.
  • Follow up throughout the application process. Always follow up with a thank-you note immediately after the interview. It’s also okay to send a quick email to the hiring manager one to two weeks after submitting your resume or interviewing if you have not heard anything, but keep follow-up communication to a minimum. You don’t want to be perceived as pushy, the report said.
  • Know what you’re worth. Many companies are wooing in-demand candidates with higher pay and other benefits. Use resources to determine a starting compensation range for your desired position in your local market.
  • Partner with a specialized recruiter. Work with a staffing firm to uncover opportunities that match your skill-set. Consider temporary work to learn which industries and work environments suit you or get your foot in the door at a company that interests you, said Accountemps.

Companies Are Ready to Hire

According to a recently released report by Indeed61 percent of the 1,000 HR leaders who were surveyed said they expect to hire more people this year than they did in 2017. By contrast, just 10 percent are planning to reduce their rate of hiring, while the rest plan to maintain current levels.

Most businesses in virtually every industry should see a jump in hiring in 2018, but some will be more aggressive in going after talent than others, according to the report. The most active sectors for recruiting will be architecture and engineering, where 82 percent plan to hire; IT and telecom companies (75 percent); and professional services firms (71 percent).

“I’ve been recruiting for nearly 30 years, and rarely have I been as optimistic as I am right now about the coming year,” said Rob Tillman, founder of executive search firm TillmanCarlson. “Historically, recruiting activity has most closely tracked the consumer confidence index which is now at a 17-year high. With the stock market at all-time highs and tax cuts on the horizon, economic conditions should get even better in 2018. While we may be entering the final stages of the economic recovery, the trends we see in the war for talent should become even more pronounced in 2018.”

Talent Shortages

Top global HR leaders and executive recruiters say these are tough days for finding talent in virtually every market sector around the world, and it’s a situation that is unlikely to improve anytime soon. Companies also continue to have trouble attracting and hiring top talent. As the scope of readily available high-level candidates shrinks, leading prospects have more offers than ever. A recent study by Aberdeen Group found that 87 percent of companies have difficulty establishing a talent pipeline.

“I feel like hiring great talent is tougher than at any time before,” said Gabor Varjasi, chief human resources officer at the Hungarian Post in Budapest. “We should be getting ready for how much harder it will be in a few years because the talent shortage problem is deepening. New jobs are emerging in the U.S., Europe and Asia and Africa is also developing by tremendous investments in banking, the telecom sector and a number of others.”

“Company talent pools are shrinking, and competition is getting more intense,” said Mr. Varjasi. “The only way to get ahead of all this is to understand as best we can the trends that are shaping how organizations should and could recruit in the coming years. For anyone connected to HR, you better get more informed very fast about the challenges as well as the opportunities coming. AI will soon infuse every aspect of HR. We’re simply not ready for this, especially on a global scale.”

More countries are delivering positive economic news every week, Mr. Varjasi said. But he questions how sustainable growth can be with such a lack of talent. “We cannot expand without people,” he said. “So I expect pressure to remain on finding and retaining talent across Europe and U.S. Asia, on the other hand, is becoming more and more attractive on the global labor market. It’s going to be a bumpy ride into the future.”

Warren Buffett Says, “If You Hire People on Intelligence but They Lack This Other Trait, Don’t Bother!”

Warren Buffett gave some great advice a few years ago on key attributes to look for when considering job candidates.

He narrowed it down to three, but one is purely non-negotiable. Buffet said:

You’re looking for three things, generally, in a person: intelligence, energy, and integrity. And if they don’t have the last one, don’t even bother with the first two.

Buffett is dead on. Here’s why integrity is so important in the people you hire, especially your future managers.

You don’t question them for their actions.

Hall of Fame football coach Tony Dungy, in his book Uncommon, said: “Integrity is the choice between what’s convenient and what’s right.” When someone leads with integrity, it makes it hard to question that person.

People operating within parameters of truth, honesty, and ethics will listen to their heart and do the right thing, even when nobody is watching. Their actions are open for everyone to see; they don’t have to worry about hiding anything from anyone, nor do you have to worry about them hiding anything from you!

Trust is developed seamlessly.

When someone exercises integrity and good judgment, trust is gained, especially with those working and collaborating in close proximity. Colleagues see each other as dependable and accountable for their actions. When trust develops, people feel safe in each other’s presence and influence is spread within the tribe.

Spotlight
Patti Thoma
After 14 years with the same company, my position was affected due to a corporate consolidation. Even though I knew it was coming, I was worried about starting a job search after being out of the market for so long. My FACET Career Strategist, Harry LeBouef, helped me update my resume to work with online systems, and coached me through ways to search and use LinkedIn to connect with people. In addition, the written materials FACET provided were very helpful as I tried to get my thoughts together to launch my job search. The elevator pitch worksheet was especially useful when I started interviewing.I was really nervous about reaching out to strangers, but Harry encouraged me and helped me develop different approaches to networking with specific professionals. Harry was a huge source of support. We talked weekly about what I had accomplished that week, and he helped me create a list of things to do the next week. He was always upbeat and positive, and would not allow me to undersell myself. More than anything, he kept my spirits up. I’m very thankful to Harry and FACET for giving me the confidence I needed to land a director-level job.

~FacetGroup.com

6 Steps to take when using LinkedIn to Network for a Job

DECEMBER 2017 BLOG

6 Steps to take when using LinkedIn to Network for a Job

You’ve heard it before: LinkedIn is the world’s largest professional, online networking application with approximately 470 million worldwide members*. It’s also said that LinkedIn is growing at a rapid rate of two people per second. And according to Jobvite.com, at least 87 percent of recruiters are sourcing for talent on LinkedIn.

Here’s another fact that I can personally attest to: most recruiters with whom I’ve spoken tell me that LinkedIn is their site of choice when it comes to looking for talent. Not Facebook.com, Monster.com, Indeed.com, or SimplyHired.com.

Shouldn’t these facts be enough to use LinkedIn for your job search? Now, here’s the question: how can you most effectively use LinkedIn to network for a job?

1. LinkedIn is more than your online résumé

First of all, your LinkedIn profile is not simply your resume. This said, I suggest to my LinkedIn workshop that their first move is to copy and paste their résumé to their new LinkedIn profile.

From there, however, you need to add to it to make it more of a networking document that expresses your value, while also showing your personality. For example, your Summary must tell a story describing your passion for what you do, how you do what you do, and throw in some accomplishments to immediately sell yourself.

Your Experience section must include accomplishment statements with quantified results that include numbers, dollars, and percentages. I prefer each job to comprise only of accomplishments, while other LinkedIn members throw everything into the mix,

Also important is that your LinkedIn profile is optimized for keyword searches by recruiters and hiring managers. They’re looking for a specific title, vital areas of expertise, and location. For example: “sales operations” AND CRM “lead generation” AND pharmaceutical AND “greater Boston area”.

Read how to create a powerful profile with the new LinkedIn.

2. Use LinkedIn to network with people at your desired companies

Perhaps one of LinkedIn’s greatest strengths is the ability to locate the key players at the companies for which you’d like to work. My suggestion is that first you create a list of your target companies and from there connect with people on your level in those companies.

There are ways to go about getting noticed by the people with whom you’d like to connect:
1 You may want to first follow said people
2 When you visit their profile, show your profile (don’t choose anonymous)
3 Like or comment on their posts
4 Wait to see if they reach out to you first
5 Finally, ask to connect with them using a personalized message, not the default LinkedIn one

Read this popular post on the proper way to connect.

Once you’ve built your foundation, you can ask for introductions to the individuals who would be making the hiring decisions. You don’t want to do this immediately because hiring managers will be less likely to connect with you without an introduction.

Find Out The Four Steps: CLICK HERE
BE THE BEST ‘YOU’ THAT YOU ARE IN YOUR JOB SEARCH.
PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE!

How Older Job-Seekers Can Overcome Their 3 Biggest Roadblocks

NOVEMBER 1 2017 BLOG

How Older Job-Seekers Can Overcome Their 3 Biggest Roadblocks
SOURCE: Mary Eileen Williams

As a post-50 job-seeker, you know all too well that ageism presents some major barriers to your success. Younger hiring managers are far too prone to believing unfortunate stereotypes about your skill sets, fit within the organization and attitude. Yet, by recognizing the negative preconceptions you are likely to face and preparing ways to address these obstacles, you can shift their focus to highlight
your strengths. Here are three of the biggest roadblocks and best ways to handle them.

Roadblock #1: Technology
Negative preconception: Your technical skills are deficient and outdated.

What you can do: This is the #1 stereotype held against applicants of a certain age. Unless you take the steps to address and resolve this belief, you will be eliminated on the spot.

• First, you have to be very clear that your skills are up-to-date and valued in today’s marketplace. There is no way around this. You must have the technical skills for the job. For a listing of websites that offer free and low-fee training, check out my recent Huff/Post 50 article entitled, “Why Right Now May Be The Best Time Of The Year To Find A Job.”

• Secondly, be certain you let your interviewer know that you possess the skills required for the position. If you do not openly share this information, they are likely to leap to the assumption that your skill set is outdated. That said, unless your interviewer is woefully inept, this make-or-break stereotype will remain unspoken — rendering it silent but deadly.

• You want, therefore, to practice ways you can proactively bring up any hidden objections during the interview. This is your best way to dispel these types of misconceptions. Saying something like, “I pride myself on keeping my skills cutting-edge and current” or “I’ve become the go-to person for coworkers who need help with the technical aspects of the job” are phrases that will allow you to pave the way to list your technical proficiencies. Follow these statements by citing solid examples of times when your technical expertise solved a problem, expedited a procedure or otherwise made a difference.

• Thirdly, highlight and make special note of your cross-functional skill sets. State something along the lines of, “My combination of skills in both x & y has allowed me to….” You want to show that, not only are you proficient in the skills required for the position, but—moreover—how you can contribute in ways that others cannot. This is one important instance when age and experience will give you a substantial edge over the competition.

Roadblock #2: You Won’t Fit In With The Group
Negative preconception: Hiring you will prove a cultural and personality mismatch. As an older applicant, you are likely to be stuck in your ways and unable to deal with change in a fast-paced environment. Furthermore, you may refuse to take direction from someone younger.

What you can do: Make it very clear that you have reported to younger bosses many times in the past. It has never been a problem nor have you experienced difficulties dealing with a rapidly changing workplace.

• Proactively state that you enjoy working with and learning from people of all ages. You are invigorated by diverse, fast-paced environments and thrive on variety, challenge and change. Prepare examples of times when you came up with innovative solutions and/or resolved unexpected problems. Share instances when your boss was especially complimentary and you were singled out for your contributions.

• Stress your flexibility and adaptability by providing illustrations that demonstrate you are a quick study and enjoy learning new things. Periodically refer to the fact that you like what you do, know you’re good at it, and want to continue to grow your skill set.

• Show energy and enthusiasm for the position, the company and what you know you can contribute. Be sure to make your nonverbal messages and vocal tone upbeat and enthusiastic. A positive attitude will go a long way to dispel the idea that you are just going through the motions, reluctant to take direction and can’t relate to younger co-workers.

Find Out What the Third Roadblock is: CLICK HERE

SPOTLIGHT
Laura Koury
U.S. Congress Staff Assistant
Biloxi, MS
FACET’s Resume & Career Centers services were vital to my career. They produced high-quality work and I could not be happier with the results.

The writer I worked with is very detail oriented and strives to give you the best results while keeping your best interests in mind. I would definitely recommend their services to those on the job hunt.

JOB SEARCH A Simple Networking Strategy That Makes You Memorable (for the Right Reasons)

You know that networking can connect you with the next big opportunity in your career. And that’s exactly why you leave your comfort zone to do it.

But all your efforts are a little pointless if you never follow up in a meaningful way. If you want to grow that initial meeting into something more, you have to impress the other person, and lay the foundation for an ongoing relationship.

Fortunately, it’s not as daunting as it sounds.

There’s a simple strategy you can use to stand out and impress anyone you meet (even if they’ve met 100 other people that day). I call it the Super-Connector strategy.

It’s not a substitute for the basics like confident body language and a concise elevator pitch when you introduce yourself. Rather, it builds on them to help you stand out.

Here’s how it works: Every time you meet someone new, think of one person in your network who they’d benefit from knowing, and then do your best to make the introduction within a week.

In order to do this well, you should be asking questions to learn about your new contact’s background and recent work. For example, Muse writer Andrew Horn suggests the following alternatives to “What do you do?”:

What are you most excited about at the moment?

Any big challenges coming down the line for you?

What’s the next big thing you have coming up?

If you didn’t do what you’re doing now—what kind of job would you have?

What This Sounds Like

“You know, I actually have a colleague who made the transition from nonprofit to tech. I’ll ask about connecting the two of you this week so you can share ideas.”

Why This Works

Clearly, you’re offering to connect them so they can gain valuable insights and new connection. But, it isn’t just generous, there are a lot of ways this will benefit you too:

It encourages you to listen more than you talk because you’re so focused on what they’re doing. And that helps you look genuinely interested.
It makes you stand out because you’re offering something rather than asking for help or advice. You’re giving, not taking.
It’s a seamless transition into getting their contact info.
It gives you an angle to follow-up later that week. Meeting somebody one time doesn’t make them an asset in your network. It takes multiple conversations—and this starts that discussion.
It shows how thoughtful you are. By saying you’ll check with the other person first, they know you’re thinking about how you can add value, but not simply assuming; and that you’ll treat them with the same respect. (P.S. Asking that other contact is called a “double opt-in intro” and we have a template for it here.)

As with anything else, the more you practice it, the easier it’ll become—and the more people you’ll add to your network. So, stand out by taking yourself out of the equation. Trust me: By thinking about the most valuable contact for the other person, you’ll make yourself even more memorable.

HOW TO USE LinkedIn TO FIND YOUR DREAM JOB Source: Steven Petrow

So, you want a new job? If you’re like more than 450 million others on the planet, you’re going to turn to LinkedIn to let your fingers do the heavy lifting of finding a new position. I should know—I’ve been there, done that.

But here’s something I learned only recently: More and more businesses are using LinkedIn as either their primary, or in many cases exclusive, job-posting site — which means you’ve got to learn how to play the LinkedIn game.

Job Description

Teddy Burriss, social media strategist anLinkedIn coach and trainer, says the first thing to do is make sure the job you’re seeking is in your wheelhouse, meaning, “that it’s highly relevant to who you are and what you do.” If you’re an administrative assistant, for example, it’s downright foolish to apply for a risk management position. “You’re just shooting at opportunities,” Burriss says with a quick laugh, “wasting a hiring manager’s time and tarnishing your own reputation.”

Number two: Your profile must demonstrate that you are “relevant” to the position — it needs to show the recruiter or hiring manager that you have the requisite skills, talent, and experience for this particular job. How do you do that? That takes us to Burriss’s next recommendation: Your profile must use the key words relevant to the position you want. Before you apply for positions bake those words into your profile. (To add skills to your profile, check out this guide on LinkedIn.)

Key Words

Well, that sounds easy-peasy, right? Not so fast. “Key words are not common sense,” Burriss admits, because hiring managers are often idiosyncratic in the language they use to describe a position. What you must do, he counsels, is study each job description and use the words it uses in your profile and résumé.

Trudy Steinfeld, associate vice president and executive director of NYU’s Wasserman Center for Career Development, also stresses the importance of using the right key words, because that’s how “applicant tracking systems and LinkedIn work. You have to use those exact same words to beat it.”

Burriss’s third suggestion is the most intriguing — and I actually think it’s the most likely to help you succeed: Even if a position is relevant to your skill set and sounds perfect for you, don’t just apply for it willy nilly. Burriss insists that you first need to build a relationship with individuals in the companies where you want to work.  Sure, it seems a bit old-school, but even in our high-tech world you must network.

Groups and Influencers

While you are on LinkedIn, but before you begin your job search, start a business conversation—not a job conversation—that shows off your smarts. NYU’s Steinfeld recommends joining relevant groups and following people on LinkedIn who are connected to your career interests. This will allow you to comment on relevant topics in public forums, which may get you the attention from so-called “influencers” that you’re seeking.

To join a professional group Burriss told me that a high number of jobs are what he calls “hidden” ones—they’re not publicly posted. If you’ve developed multiple relationships over time with the right people, they will come to you with these job openings. How great—and what a trick – is that! Need help finding a professional group? (Click here for an alphabetical listing or here to search by interest, organization, or affiliation.)

Advice

6 BEHAVIOURAL INTERVIEW TIPS

 

      An in-person interview can be a critical step in the hiring process and can help a recruiter or hiring manager determine whether a Job Candidate fits the organizational safety culture and core safety values of your company. Studies have shown that behavioral interviewing can be an effective interviewing technique and can help the interviewer understand more about how a candidate might act when faced with a workplace concern or safety issue.

      The premise behind behavioral interviewing is that a person’s past behavior can more accurately predict future performance in similar situations. By asking a job candidate how they performed in specific real-life settings, you’ll gain a better idea of how that person may behave if they work at your company. By considering a candidate’s propensity to adopt safe workplace practices, business owners can gain insight into how they will embrace the company’s safety culture.



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